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Should Sex Ed Include Porn?

I know, I know. It sounds a little bit crazy, right? School is a place to learn about biology, to learn about the risks of pregnancy and STIs, and to learn about marriage and monogamy, supposedly. We all know that Sex Ed across the globe is severely lacking – whether it’s on the subject of LGBTQIA+ subjects, on gender, on sexuality, on relationships. But what is no-one campaigning to be involved in this sex ed? Porn.

But believe it or not, porn will influence your kids more than anything they will ever learn in school. Which is why we need to talk about it.

My husband Pablo and I have been working to provide parents and teachers with the tools they need to talk to teenagers about pornography. In case you missed it, it’s called The Porn Conversation! And it’s full of practical, useful guides to help you have the conversation with children and teenagers of varying ages. Phew! We even redecorated our website, check it out! Our mission is to encourage parents to talk to their kids about what they are going to see online. To tell them that it’s normal to be curious, but what they are going to see is a representation of sex and not what real sex is actually like. That they are going to see men and women who have had a lot of plastic surgery, or taken steroids. That the average penis size is not what you see in porn. That you shouldn’t treat women the way they are treated in porn, because it’s mostly violent, rampant misogyny.

The problem we have right now is that good, useful sex education is lacking, pretty much everywhere. Even in places like the UK, sex education isn’t mandatory in 65% of schools. At no point in their education does anyone need to even teach them about consent, which seems pretty important, no? But our kids, even the young ones, aren’t oblivious to sex! They hear about it from the society around them and go straight to Google to answer the questions their schools won’t and they’re too afraid to ask from their parents.

Unfortunately, pretty much every time you type something sex related into a search engine, you’ll be greeted by something like PornHub. Regardless of how educational or simply inquisitive your search, you’re going to be bombarded with bad, degrading, disrespectful sex which doesn’t always appear to be consensual.

So how do we stop our kids finding these sites? The fact is we can’t. So instead of ignoring what our children are seeing, why not educate them about it? By acknowledging something like this, it immediately becomes less shameful and opens up a dialogue, which leads to healthy, active learning!

Porn is always going to exist, so giving kids the tools to be critical and aware of what they’re watching is unbelievably important! They should be able to differentiate between what is bad, chauvinistic porn and what is respectful, equal sex that consenting adults can enjoy. When they are old enough, they will see that good porn can promote feminism and diversity! It definitely promotes consent, safety and pleasure.

By learning to distinguish between different types of sex they see around them, kids will develop much healthier attitudes towards sex and relationships. By having open and honest conversations, they’ll have the opportunity to discuss their feelings, communicate their sexual desires and be happier people for it!

Check out The Porn Conversation now for all the guides you need!

 

 

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